Brian Jones

The History of Brian Jones

The Rolling Stones release "Let It Bleed"

The Rolling Stones released Let It Bleed on November 28th, 1969. Although The Rolling Stones had begun the recording of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” in May 1968, before Beggars Banquet had been released, recording for Let It Bleed began in earnest in February 1969 and would continue sporadically until November. During the recording founding member Brian Jones left and he tragically died soon after. He was replaced by 20 year old Mick Taylor. Upon release Let It Bleed made it to number 3 on the Billboard charts and in the UK it hit the number 1 spot on the album chart. Let It Bleed went on to go Double Platinum in the USA.

Brian Jones Funeral held in his home town of Cheltenham

Lewis Brian Jones was buried in his home town of Cheltenham on July 10th, 1969. The funeral service was held at St Mary’s Parish Church and he was buried in Cheltenham Cemetery.

Before the funeral, fans had already sent enough flowers to fill the cemetery, including a guitar shaped arrangement from Brian’s family and a huge arrangement spelling out “Gates of Heaven” from The Rolling Stones.

On the day of the funeral the town was besieged with tearful fans, curious onlookers and swarms of press photographers. The 14-car funeral procession crawled to the cemetery at a pace even more stately than usual as its progress was blocked by the surging crowds.

Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones dies in his Swimming Pool

As 1968 drew to a close, Brian Jones did what all rock-stars now do and bought himself a country retreat. Cotchford Farm is a country manor house in the East Sussex countryside, formerly owned by A. A. Milne, author of the Winnie The Pooh books, and included a large outdoor swimming pool.

Around midnight on July 2nd, Brian Jones was found at the bottom of his swimming pool in mysterious circumstances. All attempts to revive him failed. He was 27.

The coroners report found that while Brian Jones had been drinking there was no evidence of hard drugs in his system. However the police investigation and coroners report have left many unanswered questions, but the verdict to this day remains that Brian Jones died through misadventure.

Brian Jones Leaves The Rolling Stones

Brian Jones‘ relationship with the other Rolling Stones had broken down. Along with the Brian‘s deteriorating relationship with the other Stones his health was deteriorating with his dependency on various narcotics. Also Brian Jones, the blues purist, had been unhappy with the direction The Rolling Stones were taking had barely played on “Let It Bleed” the situation could not continue and on on June 8th, 1969 Brian Jones and The Rolling Stones parted company.

The Rolling Stones Rock & Roll Circus Filmed

The Rolling Stones Rock & Roll Circus was filmed over 18 hours on December 11th and 12th, 1968. Featuring The Rolling Stones, The Who and a Supergroup called Dirty Mac featuring Eric Clapton, Mitch Mitchell and John Lennon amongst others it was due to be shown by the BBC, but Mick Jagger held it back as he was unhappy with their performance. Tragically it would also be the last time Brian Jones would perform with The Rolling Stones, and died in his swimming pool little more that 6 months later.

Police raid Keith Richard's "Redlands" home in Sussex for drugs

Around 5:30pm on February 12th, 1967, around 20 police descended on Keith Richards‘ Sussex home, “Redlands”. Both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were arrested and sentenced to jail for drug offenses. Amid much public outcry The Rolling Stones found an unlikely ally in the shape of the conservative editor of The Times, William Rees-Mogg.
The Time’s editorial piece, “Who breaks a butterfly on a wheel?” is considered to be a key factor in Keith Richards acquittal and Mick Jagger‘s conditional discharge. It also signified a major shift in public opinion in the UK.

Brian Jones is Born

Lewis Brian Hopkin Jones was born in the town’s Park Nursing Home on February 28th 1942, the first child for Lewis Blount Jones, an aircraft designer, and Louisa Beatrice Jones, a piano teacher. The Jones were a well-to-do, middle class family, living in a nice house in a good neighborhood of a nice, middle class town. Not the background you would expect for a man that would become synonymous with the excesses of the 1960s